Logospace
   
 
space
space
space
 
space
space
space
space
space
space
space
space
space
space
 
     
   
UBCP Maternal-Fetal Medicine provides
a full spectrum of advanced services for complex maternal-
fetal medical conditions:
space
Perinatal consultation  
space
Prenatal care  
space
Pregnancy co-management  
space
Prenatal diagnosis:  
space
  Ultrasound space
space
Amniocentesis space
space
Chorionic villus sampling (CVS)  
space
Genetic counseling  
space
Screening for chromosomal abnormalities
space
Diabetes in pregnancy  
space
High-risk hospital and delivery services with:  
space
  Perinatal OBs in-hospital at all times  
 
   
 

Definitions

   

ABSMC:
Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, 2450 Ashby Avenue, Berkeley CA 94705

Amniocentesis:
A procedure during which a needle is inserted transabdominally into the uterus and a small sample of amniotic fluid is obtained and tested for a variety of disorders, most commonly chromosomal abnormalities (such as Down syndrome).

California Integrated Screening:
Involves an ultrasound and a blood test in the 1st trimester followed by a blood test in the 2nd trimester. Results are reported after each test is performed, and different diagnostic options, such as CVS or amniocentesis, are offered if you have a positive screen result.

Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS):
A procedure during which a small sample of placental tissue is obtained either transabdominally or transvaginally and is analyzed for the presence of a variety of disorders, most commonly chromosomal abnormalities (such as Down syndrome).

Chromosomal Abnormalities:
Chromosomal abnormalities describe changes in the normal number of chromosomes or normal structure of the chromosomes themselves.

Co-management:
East Bay Perinatal physicians will work with your provider to provide the best care and expertise to handle any problems that have been identified with your pregnancy.

CVS:
A procedure during which a small sample of placental tissue is obtained either transabdominally or transvaginally and is analyzed for the presence of a variety of disorders, most commonly chromosomal abnormalities (such as Down syndrome).

Down Syndrome:
The most common chromosomal abnormality in humans at birth. Associated abnormalities include heart defects, mental retardation, intestinal abnormalities and growth disorders. Down syndrome can be screened for prenatally using a variety of non-invasive blood and ultrasound tests, and by invasive testing for a definitive diagnosis.

EBPMA:
East Bay Perinatal Medical Associates, the most experienced high-risk pregnancy program in the Bay Area, with offices throughout the East Bay. We provide high-risk pregnancy consultations, midwifery services, prenatal diagnostic services, diabetes management and management of complicated pregnancies.

Fetal Nuchal Translucency:
An ultrasound measurement at the back of the fetal neck which, when coupled with blood tests will assess the risk of th fetus having a chromosomal abnormality.

First Trimester Screening:
A non-invasive test that includes an ultrasound of the fetus and a finger-stick blood test to determine the risk of Down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities. Approximately 85-90% Trisomy 21 and Trisomy 18 can be detected. Results are available between 11 and 14 weeks.

Generalist Obstetrical Physician:
A residency-trained obstetrician and gynecologist, expert in diseases specific to women.

Genetic Counseling:
An approximately one-hour appointment with a genetic counselor or geneticist to discuss prenatal diagnostic choices and individual risks of genetic problems. We encourage you to bring a family member to these sessions.

Genetic Counselor:
A health professional with a specialized graduate degree and experience in the areas of medical genetics and counseling. They provide information and support to families who may be at risk for a variety of inherited or chromosomal conditions. Certified by the American Board of Genetic Counseling or the American Board of Medical Genetics.

Genetic Testing:
Testing a patient’s blood or embryo’s tissue for the presence of specific genetic defects. These tests help to diagnose genetically transmitted diseases and enable the genetic counselor to estimate the risk of transmitting the defect to the unborn fetus.

Geneticist:
A physician specially trained in the detection of genetically inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease and chromosomal abnormalities, who is available for consultation with parents at risk for these and other diseases.

Gestational:
Related to pregnancy, i.e. gestational age (age of pregnancy) and gestational diabetes (diabetes related to pregnancy)

High-Risk Obstetrical:
Obstetric or medical issues during pregnancy that increase the risk of adverse outcomes, including pregnancy complications (preterm labor, preeclampsia, rupture of the membranes) and medical complications that can affect the pregnancy (diabetes, hypertension, lupus).

Integrated Screening:
A series of blood tests and ultrasound performed in the 1st and 2nd trimesters that screen for Down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities. Integrated screening carries the highest detection rate (90-92%) for Down syndrome for a non-invasive test. Results are available at 16-20 weeks.

Maternal-Fetal Medicine:
The medical specialty devoted to the care of the pregnant patient with high-risk complications such as medical problems (diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune diseases such as lupus), pregnancy-related problems (preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia), and also devoted to expertise in prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and genetic testing.

Maternal-Fetal Medicine Specialist:
A physician devoted to the care of the pregnant patient with high-risk complications such as medical problems (diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune diseases such as lupus), pregnancy-related problems (preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia), and also devoted to expertise in prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and genetic testing.

Multidisciplinary:
The use of specialists from multiple fields to approach high-risk pregnancy problems, i.e., a maternal-fetal medicine specialist to assist in managing diabetes and its complications in conjunction with the patient’s physician or a kidney specialist (nephrologist) to assist in managing kidney failure.

Neural Tube:
A tube formed by the closure of ectodermal tissue in the early vertebrate embryo that later develops into the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and ganglia.

Nuchal Translucency:
A nuchal translucency ultrasound measures the fluid at the back of a baby’s neck between 11 and 14 weeks of pregnancy to determine the risk of birth defects, including chromosome abnormalities such as Down syndrome, Trisomy 13, and Trisomy 18.

Obstetrician:
A physician who specializes in obstetrics, the branch of medical science concerned with childbirth and caring for and treating women in or in connection with childbirth.

Open Neural Tube Defect:
A defect resulting from failure of the neural tube to close, such as spina bifida and other spinal cord or intracranial abnormalities.

PDC:
(Prenatal Diagnosis Center) A designation for an ultrasound center that has been certified by the State of California as having the physicians, sonographers, and genetic counselors with expertise in performing prenatal diagnostic procedures such as a fetal anatomic ultrasound, invasive procedures such as amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS), and in providing genetic counseling for patients at risk for genetic syndromes.

Perinatal:
Having to do with pregnancy and the birth process.

Perinatal OB:
A physician who specializes in obstetrics, with an emphasis on the management of labor and delivery.

Perinatologist:
A physician devoted to the care of the pregnant patient with high-risk complications such as medical problems (diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune diseases such as lupus), pregnancy-related problems (preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia), and also devoted to expertise in prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and genetic testing.

Perinatology:
The medical specialty devoted to the care of the pregnant patient with high-risk complications such as medical problems (diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune diseases such as lupus), pregnancy-related problems (preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia), and also devoted to expertise in prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and genetic testing.

Preconception:
Having to do with the time period before conception.

Pregestational:
Before pregnancy.

Prenatal:
Before birth, during pregnancy.

Prenatal Diagnosis:
Any of the diagnostic procedures used to determine whether a fetus has a genetic abnormality.

Prenatal Diagnosis Center (PDC):
A designation for an ultrasound center that has been certified by the State of California as having the physicians, sonographers, and genetic counselors with expertise in performing prenatal diagnostic procedures such as a fetal anatomic ultrasound, invasive procedures such as amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS), and in providing genetic counseling for patients at risk for genetic syndromes.

Quad Screen:
A blood test performed at 15-20 weeks to assess risk of certain chromosomal abnormalities (such as Down syndrome) and certain fetal anatomic abnormalities, such as spina bifida or abdominal wall defects.

Screen Positive:
A patient who is identified at increased risk of whatever the screening test is attempting to detect, i.e, Down syndrome by 1st trimester combined screening, integrated screening, 2nd trimester serum or Quad screening, etc. Positive screening tests are indications for advancing to invasive testing such as amniocentesis or CVS to definitively determine whether the abnormality exists. Usually screening tests are designed to detect as many cases of a particular abnormality without significantly increasing the risk of unnecessary procedures.

Second Trimester Serum Screening:
A blood test performed at 15-20 weeks to assess risk of certain chromosomal abnormalities (such as Down syndrome) and certain fetal anatomic abnormalities, such as spina bifida or abdominal wall defects.

Sonographer:
A certified special program-trained technician who performs ultrasound examinations.

Sweet Success Diabetes in Pregnancy Program:
A state-certified program that provides a multidisciplinary approach to managing a pregnant diabetic, including diet control, medication management, and education of the patient regarding the complications and nutritional management of this disorder.

Transabdominally:
Approaching through the abdomen, as with an ultrasound transducer, or amniocentesis or CVS needle.

Transducer:
The probe that the ultrasonographer utilizes to allow imaging of the maternal and fetal structures through the abdominal wall or vagina.

Transvaginally:
Approaching through the vagina or cervix, as with an ultrasound transducer or CVS catheter.

Trisomy 13:
A chromosomal abnormality caused by an extra chromosome number 13.

Trisomy 18:
A chromosomal abnormality caused by an extra chromosome number 18. Also known as Edwards Syndrome.

Ultrasonographer:
A certified special program-trained technician who performs ultrasound examinations.

Ultrasound:
The technology that utilizes sound waves above the audible spectrum to visualize structures within the mother and fetus. It is generally accepted that the methodology utilized by today’s modern machines in procedures recommended by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine carry no significant risk to the fetus or mother.

URAD:
Ultrasound Risk Assessment for Down Syndrome – a scoring system that utilizes an ultrasound of the fetus at 16-22 weeks to assist in determining the risk of the fetus carrying the Down syndrome chromosomal abnormality. It utilizes the presence of “soft markers”, findings that are not anomalies but whose presence at the time of the ultrasound examination may suggest and increased risk of Down syndrome (Trisomy 21).

space
 
 
 
 © EBPMA 2008. All rights reserved.
Site Design: JM Design  |  Site Architect: Quadeptus 
space